Christmas in Italy

Here are the most frequently asked questions about Christmas in Italy.

When and how long is Christmas?
How do they decorate for Christmas?
What about the Christmas tree?
What do they eat for Christmas?
Do they have any traditional Christmas songs?

When and how long is Christmas?

Christmas in Italy goes  only for twelve days from December 24th through January 6th.

Traditionally, the first day of Christmas really is Christmas, not Christmas Eve, because the celebrations started with midnight mass.  In some parts of Italy they do celebrate with a very special dinner, but most people celebrate Christmas day.

Christmas day is spent with family.  In fact, they have a saying: “Natale con i tuoi, Pasqua con chi vuoi”, which translated means: “Christmas with your family, Easter with whoever you like.”

The day after Christmas is also very important.  It called “Santo Stefano” (Saint Steven), In English we have a reminder of the festivity in the first line of the song Good King Wenceslas: “Good King Wenceslas looked out, on the Feast of Stephen,…”

The last day of Christmas is the Epiphany, January 6th,  – day that celebrates the arrival of the magi to bring gifts to the King.  It is also called the day of the “Befana” because a “good” witch visits children, complete with broom and a bag full of gifts.  Good children receive sweets, but bad children receive coal!

Today Christmas in Italy has become more commercialized as in many parts of the United States and Europe.  There are many Christmas lights and bells ringing.

 

How do they decorate for Christmas?

They are not big on decorating their houses for Christmas, but even the smallest of towns will have festive Christmas lights adorning the streets, and most likely a Christmas star on top of the church’s bell tower.  Most people today will have a Christmas tree and a Presepe (see the following discussion).

 

What about the Christmas tree?

Traditionally the Italian people did not know much about Santa Claus, or holly or Christmas trees.

Italians do have Christmas trees now, though in the past they were more into the  Nativity scene. Legend has it that the nativity scene, (alternately presepe, presepio or crèche) was invented by Saint Francis near here in Assisi in the early 1200s.

These nativity scenes, which are very elaborate, going beyond the Biblical story to depict medieval peasant scenes, with hundreds of people gathered to worship the holy family.

Though Italians traditionally have celebrated a “religious” Christmas, this does not mean that they celebrate a Christ-filled Christmas.

The traditional image of Christmas is of the “perpetual Virgin” Mary (Madonna), holding the helpless Christ-child (Gesù Bambino).  Gesù Bambino was the one who would bring gifts to children.

Mary, however always grasps people attention, and is celebrated and prayed to in their Christmas masses.  She and the saints are asked to intercede on behalf of the people, who in their view are not worthy to approach God or Jesus directly.

People pay offerings to light candles, which are supposed to help their dead family members to move more swiftly from purgatory to heaven.

 

What do they eat for Christmas?

Every region of Italy differs in their specialty.  On the coast they prefer dishes that have fish in them.  In Umbria, where we live, women start days before Christmas preparing cappelletti, a fresh pasta filled with meat and usually served in a meat broth.

Often a cappone, a kind of chicken, is used for the broth.  Pasta al forno (pasta cooked in the oven) is also very popular.

The most famous Pasta al Forno of course is Lasagna!

Traditional desserts vary by region, but some of the most common ones are Panettone (fruit cake), Pandoro and Torrone.  Chocolate is also very prevalent today, especially for us, since Perugia is home of the most famous Italian chocolate factory.

 

Do they have any traditional Christmas songs?

The most traditional Christmas song in Italy is “Tu Scendi dalle Stelle“.                               Here are the translated words (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tu_scendi_dalle_stelle)

From starry skies descending,
Thou comest, glorious King,
A manger low Thy bed,
In winter’s icy sting;

O my dearest Child most holy,
Shudd’ring, trembling in the cold!
Great God, Thou lovest me!
What suff’ring Thou didst bear,
That I near Thee might be!

Thou art the world’s Creator,
God’s own and true Word,
Yet here no robe, no fire
For Thee, Divine Lord.

Dearest, fairest, sweetest Infant,
Dire this state of poverty.
The more I care for Thee,
Since Thou, o Love Divine,
Will’st now so poor to be.

Traditionally it is sung with the accompaniment of a zampogna, which is the Italian version of a bagpipe.

Have we missed some important ones? Do you have any more questions? Let us know!

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He is Risen!

13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ is not risen. 14 And if Christ is not risen, then our preaching is empty and your faith is also empty. 15 Yes, and we are found false witnesses of God, because we have testified of God that He raised up Christ, whom He did not raise up—if in fact the dead do not rise. 16 For if the dead do not rise, then Christ is not risen. 17 And if Christ is not risen, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins! 18 Then also those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. 19 If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable.

empty tomb

empty tomb

20 But now Christ is risen from the dead, and has become the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.*

If Christ were not risen from the dead, we would be the most worthless, sad, pitiable people.  But Christ IS risen.  Therefore all we stand for is true, and we must live for no other cause.

crucifix

crucifix

 

So many people in Italy grieve on their knees before a dead Christ, seeking confort from his “grieving mother”, or some other dead saint.

But those they seek intercession from are indeed dead.

Our Savior, however, is not dead.  HE IS ALIVE, in flesh and blood, risen the firstfruits of those who died.

May we never for a moment forget the Risen Savior that we follow and serve and testify.  Only He is worthy of our worship and our service.

*Scripture taken from the New King James Version. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
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Only One God?

[20:1] And God spoke all these words, saying, [2] “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery. [3] “You shall have no other gods before me. [4] “You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. [5] You shall not bow down to them or serve them, for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and the fourth generation of those who hate me, [6] but showing steadfast love to thousands of those who love me and keep my commandments. (Exodus 20:1-6 ESV)

madonna

How difficult can it be?  As Paul reminded us.

[5] For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, [6] who gave himself as a ransom for all, which is the testimony given at the proper time. (1 Timothy 2:5-6 ESV)

Thank you Lord Jesus, for being the only mediator we need.  To you, and to you alone do we bow.  Amen

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